The oldest panda has died after 38 year old as a'star' of the zoo

Oct 19,2016
Recently, the oldest panda world has died at a zoo in Hong Kong caused much grief travelers.

Called Jia Jia, this raccoon she had reached 38 years, equivalent human age of 114. At Ocean Park, bears are seen as the "star" of this place and attract many tourists.

 

The oldest panda world has died at a zoo in Hong Kong. (Photo: AP)

According to the South China Morning Post, Jia Jia's health showed signs of weakening, in the past two weeks, sleeping more, refusing to eat quit drinking. 16 October, she could not bear to go back 38 years, lying in bed all day. Accordingly, was diagnosed with high blood pressure, arthritis and cataracts. Bear the weight of her loss was also significantly down from 71 to 67 kg only.

Jia Jia was diagnosed with high blood pressure, arthritis and cataracts. A few days back, Jia Jia slept more and lost appetite quit drinking. 16 October on Monday, she could not bear to go back 38 years, lying in bed all day.

To avoid incurring Jia Jia pain, Agency of Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department of Hong Kong (AFCD) has an injection to her decision to leave in peace bears. Paolo Martelli doctor and veterinary director of the park who are responsible for this.

Jia Jia She panda born in the wild in 1978. Two years later, Jia Jia was taken care of at the Wolong National Nature Reserve in Sichuan Province, China. In 1999, Jia Jia and another panda AnAn are given to Hong Kong by Beijing.

 Jia Jia celebrate 37th birthday at the zoo. (Photo: AP)

After Jia Jia gone, Ocean Park is also nurturing other 3 pandas. Ying Ying and Le Le are 11 years old and healthy, while An An and Jia Jia's friends and male pandas in captivity live longer in the world, suffering from age-related diseases such as high blood pressure and arthritis.

 

Reportedly, the panda is facing a lot of species threatened with extinction in the world. The average lifespan of pandas in the wild is under 20, but they can live longer with the care of humans.

By: Foster Gonzales